Cardiologist Today!

We have an echocardiogram today at 1030! I’m actually looking forward to it because our pulmonologist said she couldn’t hear W’s heart murmur last week! The murmur is caused by a condition called a PDA.  I  got my hopes up because they’ve been hearing his murmur for 10 months now. Here’s what we’ve been dealing with since he was born:  Spoiler Alert…this is copied and pasted from a medical website and is very stimulating to the brain… 😉

What Is Patent Ductus Arteriosus?

Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is a heart problem that affects some babies soon after birth. In PDA, abnormal blood flow occurs between two of the major arteries connected to the heart. These arteries are the aorta and the pulmonary artery.

Before birth, these arteries are connected by a blood vessel called the ductus arteriosus. This blood vessel is a vital part of fetal blood circulation.

Within minutes or up to a few days after birth, the ductus arteriosus closes. This change is normal in newborns.

In some babies, however, the ductus arteriosus remains open (patent). The opening allows oxygen-rich blood from the aorta to mix with oxygen-poor blood from the pulmonary artery. This can strain the heart and increase blood pressure in the lung arteries.

Normal Heart and Heart With Patent Ductus Arteriosus

Figure A shows a cross-section of a normal heart. The arrows show the direction of blood flow through the heart. Figure B shows a heart with patent ductus arteriosus. The defect connects the aorta and the pulmonary artery. This allows oxygen-rich blood from the aorta to mix with oxygen-poor blood in the pulmonary artery.

Figure A shows a cross-section of a normal heart. The arrows show the direction of blood flow through the heart. Figure B shows a heart with patent ductus arteriosus. The defect connects the aorta and the pulmonary artery. This allows oxygen-rich blood from the aorta to mix with oxygen-poor blood in the pulmonary artery.

Overview

PDA is a type of congenital heart defect. A congenital heart defect is any type of heart problem that’s present at birth.

If your baby has a PDA but an otherwise normal heart, the PDA may shrink and go away. However, some children need treatment to close their PDAs.

Some children who have PDAs are given medicine to keep the ductus arteriosus open. For example, this may be done if a child is born with another heart defect that decreases blood flow to the lungs or the rest of the body.

Keeping the PDA open helps maintain blood flow and oxygen levels until doctors can do surgery to correct the other heart defect.

Outlook

PDA is a fairly common congenital heart defect in the United States. Although the condition can affect full-term infants, it’s more common in premature infants.

On average, PDA occurs in about 8 out of every 1,000 premature babies, compared with 2 out of every 1,000 full-term babies. Premature babies also are more vulnerable to the effects of PDA.

PDA is twice as common in girls as it is in boys.

Doctors treat the condition with medicines, catheter-based procedures, and surgery. Most children who have PDAs live healthy, normal lives after treatment

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About ourmicrolives

I am a stay at home momma to a 25 weaker, micro-preemie miracle baby boy! My husband and I are just trying to make sense of the whole parenting thing! I love to cook, bake and really eat food all day long! Fitness and lifting are one of my biggest passions and I'll share anything about that if you just ask! I am a professional American Sign Language Interpreter and love being able to have such a flexible job that works around my busy mom schedule! I just want to share the things in our life that works for us and hope that some of them may inspire or work for you too!
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